Category Archives: Press

This Stuff Is Too Important For It To Be Presented With Inaccuracies Like This.

This article describes how a disabled woman had to crowdfund her wheelchair because: “She was offered a standard NHS-issue wheelchair – but at 20kg (3st 2lb) it would have been too heavy for her and potentially dangerous, given her condition.”

This is not accurate, and it does a disservice to people who are struggling with the NHS and the NHS itself. I know that this information is inaccurate because I am in my third NHS-provided chair, and it weighs 14.2kg. The NHS has been under tremendous pressure to meet targets while their funding has been drastically cut, but an Action3 is still within the accepted category for NHS issue. It’s not a fancy basketball chair, but it’s sturdy and relatively comfortable and it’s a perfect chair for urban and some rural rolling as well. And they are affordable, even for a cash-strapped NHS. Last time I checked the were selling  for just over £500.00

I live in East London where not all kerbs are ramped and some of the surfaces can be pretty rugged, and I get around just fine in my NHS chair.

I can understand complaining about some of the hoops we have to jump through as disabled citizens, but it does a disservice to this story to have gotten the facts wrong or to have exaggerated.

Of course I could be wrong, and maybe the NHS has tightened up the criteria as to what qualifies as an acceptable chair since I got my last chair from them


The Struggle is Global

This is well done, and shows the struggle that Disabled People undergo in Bolivia.


This Is Important

I am not trying to start an argument with any parents with kids in prams that need to use the bus, but I agree with this ruling.

For the record, unless I am on a schedule, I will often take the next bus if the one I am trying to board is crowded and there is a baby buggy in the spot. However, most trips are scheduled, and so I believe that several points need to be considered as regards this territorial debate.

1. As a wheelchair user in London, I don’t have a lot of choices when it comes to public transportation.  The step-free tube stations are still scarce, and the overground doesn’t run throughout the city extensively enough to be a viable option. Unless I pony up the money to take a cab, my only choice is the bus. The bus is my primary, and almost only means of getting round London on public transportation.

2. I can’t fold up my wheelchair and sit in a regular seat. Buggies fold, and kids can sit on laps.

3. The space was originally designed for wheelchairs, not for prams. It’s fortunate for pram pushers that the space is there when there are no wheelchair users on the bus, but when someone in a chair needs the space that was designed for wheelchairs, then it’s only right that the person in the space relinquish it to the wheelchair user

So this is important.


This Is a Good Article By Another Wheelchair Traveler

And yeah, it takes courage.


Happy Anniversary

Twenty years ago today the Disability Discrimination Act was passed in the UK, later to become part of the Equality Act.


I wish this were a freak incident.

But it’s not. I cannot count how many times I have had to tell the person on the phone that I am disabled (WCHC, which means i cannot walk or stand), only to have to tell the ground crew at check in that I am WCHC disabled, and then to have to tell the ground crew at the gate that I am WCHC and will need an aisle chair, only to have them act as though this is the first time that they have heard of it, and the personnel and aisle chair arrive late, meaning I get to board in front of a plane load of passengers.

“We’ve researched the details of this Denver customer’s travel and can verify that she checked in at her flight at Newark Liberty International Airport two hours prior to her scheduled departure. but a processing error in that check-in process did not alert our employees at the gate to her special need (wheelchair) in boarding the aircraft.”

This needs to be fixed, and it isn’t specific to any one airline.


This is really discouraging,

Helen and I were in Denver a couple of years ago, and since I’m rather fond of old train stations, we went down to see Union Station. It was being renovated; surrounded by scaffolding and rubble, so we couldn’t go in.

Well they’ve finished it, according to this article, but also according to this article, “The station’s Great Hall features a public area with seating and shuffleboard tables, but the area is elevated and unreachable by people who can’t climb stairs, according to the Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition.”

And, “The Coalition says RTD has offered to set up a temporary ramp when someone needs it. The group’s attorney, Andrew Montoya, says that’s not enough.

That’s absolutely not the same experience, basically to have to go around, see that there is no ramp, and then make your way around, trying to find someone who maybe can get a ramp out for you,” Montoya said.

I know exactly what Mr Montoya is talking about. Equal access doesn’t mean that an able bodied person gets to walk up a flight of stairs while their disabled counterpart has to go find someone and ask them, “Excuse me sir/madam, could you please put up the ramp?”

How is this even possible? I could understand if the station were in its original condition, but they just renovated it and the ADA has been in force since 1990. How hard is it to install a permanent ramp?

Thank you to the Facebook group, “Representing Disability in an Ableist World” for this information.


%d bloggers like this: